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Since 2009, the Society for Abandoned Animals has provided a free neutering service for dogs roaming Hong Kong’s car parks and warehouses. The programme, which limits their numbers and prevents needless death, is made possible with the support of Fu Tak Iam Foundation.

 

The SAA has completed 3,400 such procedures to date. Yet, the programme might never have started if it weren’t for the newborn pups found on the society’s doorsteps.

 

El Chan (third from right) says running a charity like the SAA has not been easy, and she once thought of giving up. But, luckily, sponsorship has helped to keep the services going.

The society is located in Yuen Long’s Pak Sha Tsuen. Even before we arrived, we could hear a symphony of barks, whines and meows as we approached. At the time of our visit, a total of 178 dogs and 78 cats lived here under the care of founder El Chan and her team.

 

In the 1990s, Yuen Long had no shortage of agricultural land lying fallow, and rent was relatively cheap. So in 1998, Chan and some friends rented the building of a former pig farm for the purpose of housing abandoned animals.

 

Chan used to run a pet grooming shop in Happy Valley. After she moved to the village, she found herself adjusting to many customs that were new to her. The one custom that most upset her had to do with people’s attitudes to animals.

 

“A black dog, for example, is acceptable here. But if it has a patch of white hair, it may be beaten to death because villagers consider such a dog unlucky. They think the colour mix of its fur resembles the clothing of someone in mourning. We’ve taken in many of these dogs.”

 

Newborn puppies in a plastic bag

Soon after it was set up, the SAA began to receive a steady stream of abandoned animals. Residents from all around would leave them at the society’s doors. When Chan came to work in the morning, she often found animals tied to the front door. Sometimes, she arrived to the sight of pups – still wet from their mother’s uterus and with the umbilical cord attached – wriggling in a plastic bag hung from the door handle.

 

Their eyes were still closed, so they had not even a glimpse of the outside world before being dumped into a plastic bag.

 

“They would have received none of their mother’s milk, which meant they had no antibodies. Even when the weather was sweltering, their body temperatures would quickly drop. Their chances of survival are next to nothing,” Chan said. “Looking at them, I see a cycle of life – one batch arrives and one batch dies. It’s too pitiful.”

 

This has a lot to do with the villagers’ habit of keeping dogs around the village. These dogs, which are fed but live outside the house, are often deployed as guard dogs. They may seem like stray dogs to outsiders, but villagers consider them as fong yong pets.

 

Since there are no security guards in the village, unlike in city apartments, these dogs have become an important part of neighbourhood security. They keep watch over car parks and warehouses, barking whenever a stranger approached.

 

Many of the SAA’s animals are too old to have a reasonable chance of being adopted, El Chan says. But the society will keep its promise and allow these animals to live out their remaining years as comfortably as possible.

 

“The villagers leave them enough leftovers to keep them alive, and those who turn out to be good guard dogs would be selected for breeding. Out of every litter that is born, one or two will be raised to adulthood, to take over as guard dogs after the older dogs died.”

 

Of course, many more dogs are born than the villagers need. A fertile bitch can give birth twice a year, each time to a litter of up to 10 pups. Some of these puppies would grow up to become village dogs or strays; some get injured in fights or become infected with heartworm and other diseases, and often don’t live beyond three, four years. Some don’t even survive a week – newborns are often thrown into the rubbish bin to be buried alive or crushed to death during rubbish collection.

 

Being left in a plastic bag tied to the SAA’s door handle might seem a kinder fate. Those who left the pups there probably thought so.

 

Breaking the cycle of life and instant death

To prevent the needless deaths of so many dogs, Chan decided to persuade and encourage villagers to send their dogs to be neutered by the SAA’s vets.

 

It was important to take a friendly approach. A typical conversation goes like this:

 

“Oh, what a lot of dogs you have there. So many of them in a litter, are you keeping them all?”

 

“Do you want them? Take them! We can’t have so many of them. They’ll be thrown away if no one wants them.”

 

“How about I try to find some families to raise these puppies, and then send the mother to be sterilised? For free.”

 

Not a few villagers were suspicious of Chan’s motives, and could not believe she would not charge for the neutering service. Some even drove her off, snarling, “Don't come near my dog!”

 

Chan smiled as she recalled those days. “This is 100 per cent true – mention neutering to a male villager and you would be chased away for sure, because the idea is unthinkable to a man. The men think a neutered dog would become too gentle and therefore useless as a guard dog. But the fact is, a dog’s character, once formed, does not change that easily,” she said.

 

“The women can more readily accept the need for neutering, perhaps because they understand the pain of birth. Once villagers began to see that we were returning the dogs safely to the village after the procedure, word went round about our work.”

 

This is the SAA’s version of the “trap, neuter, return” (TNR) programme widely used to control the numbers of stray animals. When the society began offering the service, before 2009, it lacked the resources to do more than perform the occasional neutering service. It was not until 2009, when Fu Tak Iam Foundation provided it with funds and a group of volunteers were recruited, that the programme could be rolled out more comprehensively.

 

In a record year, the SAA performed more than 800 neutering procedures. “I remember one day when the vet had to take care of more than 30 dogs – it was non-stop work.” These days, the monthly caseload is over 20.

 

There are two reasons for the reduction, Chan said. One, more organisations are now providing a similar service; two, the TNR programme has been effective, as the dog numbers have dropped.

 

Most hearteningly, she said, she’s seeing fewer cases of a plastic bag full of pups – from a few cases every month, to one case every few months.

 

In the course of her work, Chan has met many volunteers who come from different parts of Hong Kong and who go around feeding village dogs and taking care of them. The trust they have built up with the dogs makes it easier for the SAA to capture them for neutering. “If some people were to call us heroes for the work we do, I’d say these volunteers are the true heroes,” she said.

 

Finding a new owner for a dog or a cat who would really love them is a moment of joy.

If we don’t speak up, who will?

To support the SAA’s work, Fu Tak Iam Foundation also funds a food bank to provide food for the dogs, as well as underwrite the costs of medical treatments for both stray and village dogs at the SAA. “Such services not only benefit the animals, but also the pet owners with low or no income, such as the homeless and those on welfare, by helping to lighten their burden.”

 

“We were often abused when we first started providing care for abandoned animals. People called us crazy, and told us to get out. They said, ‘There are human beings starving and all you care about are the dogs? Are you crazy?’” Chan said.

 

“My reply to them was that while humans could rely on our wisdom and capability to help ourselves and help one another, our pets rely on us to survive. They have no choice – they have to live with whatever circumstance they were born into. If we don’t speak up for them, who will?”

 

No animal left behind

The Society for Abandoned Animals was founded in 1997 by a group of animal rights advocates, and was registered as a charity a year later.

 

Chan never dreamed she would end up working in the non-profit sector. The turning point came in the run-up to the handover in 1997. “Many of my friends were leaving Hong Kong. Knowing that I love animals, they asked me to find their pets new owners. I’d known these cats and dogs since they were young and could not bear to see them abandoned, so I ended up adopting more and more of them… I was taking care of as many as 30 to 40 at one point.”

 

With so many animals to care for, Chan found herself struggling to cope with her pet grooming business. She at first sought help from an animal welfare organisation, Hong Kong’s only such group at the time that took in abandoned animals. “But when I called, the centre told me not to send the animals to them, and do what I could myself,” Chan said. “They said if the animals were sent there, they would only be put down.”

 

Today, the SAA’s mission is guided by its motto of “Love Animal, Respect Life, No Killing or Abandoning”. It is easier said than done, of course. Given the constraints of physical space, there is a limit to how many animals the society can take in. To ensure the animals are given a reasonable quality of living, the SAA sometimes has to turn away owners who wanted to leave their pets there.

 

Chan tries her best to persuade the owners to reconsider. “I don’t ask that the dog or cat be treated as a person, but at the least we ought to see them as a life. If we show them care, they can feel it,” she said.

 

“Love Animals, Respect Life, No Killing or Abandoning” is the society’s motto.

Medical centre

In November 2005, the society set up a medical centre that comes with an operation room and quarantine facilities. Apart from providing the usual range of vet services, the centre also supports the SAA’s TNR programme and offers free or subsidised treatment for animals that need it.

 

The centre’s vet consultant, Dr Patrick Chong, said the animals that left the deepest impression on him so far were a few dogs that were rescued from a breeding farm.

 

“The pet trade is so lucrative that the bitches were caged soon after they were born, and made to breed as soon as they became mature. Typically, these dogs give birth to three litters a year, every year, and are abandoned as soon as they can’t breed anymore,” he said.

 

Consultant vet Patrick Chong calls for an end to pet buying, so as to curb the illegal and inhumane breeding practices.

“The dogs I saw were skin and bones when they came here. Their teeth had rotted away and they could barely eat. They also had all kinds of skin infections and arthritic pain. Some of them also had tumours in their mammary glands. It was heart-breaking to see.”

 

Although space was limited, El Chan could not bear to turn them away. “We try to take in as many as we can. Those dogs from the breeding farm were in such horrific condition that our vets could only do what they could to ease the dogs’ suffering in their remaining days. Some were in such a bad way that we had to put them down to ease their suffering.”

 

The problem must be solved at root. In recent years, the SAA has strengthened its education campaign to provide free talks at schools and organise visits to the SAA centre. “We hope the children will take the message to their parents, a reminder that the decision to raise a pet must be taken with careful thought, and to reconsider buying a pet from a pet shop. In most cases, people don’t mean to mistreat their pets, but end up mistreating them all the same because they didn’t know any better.”

 

TNR volunteer: Never again

Winnie would be one of those volunteers El Chan calls a hero.

 

About a decade ago, Winnie noticed several dogs in her village scavenging food in the rubbish heaps. An old woman who used to look after the dogs could no longer do so when money became tight, so she fed the dogs only occasionally. When Winnie found out, she began cooking more every day so she could feed the leftovers to the dogs.

 

She gradually grew fond of the dogs. One day, Winnie realised that one of them, a bitch, was pregnant. After the dog gave birth, however, the old woman took the puppies to Luen Wo Hui and sold them to some dog eaters, at HK$100 each. When Winnie found out, she prayed that nothing like that would ever happen again.

 

Yet, half a year later, the bitch became pregnant again. Though Winnie was eager to take it to the vet for spaying, she was advised to take the safer and cheaper course and wait till after the delivery. Sadly, it was not to be.

 

One day – the day after a storm of typhoon signal 8 – Winnie found the bitch lying in a ditch with several newborn pups. She quickly took them to the vet but could not save them – the mother had died along with her pups.

 

“I fed the dog for a year. I was so sad. From that day onwards, I told myself, ‘Never again – I must take these dogs to the vet for spaying’.”

 

The first dog she caught was a bitch that had given birth so often that part of its uterus protruded from its body, and it would get burnt when it sat on the ground on hot days. Winnie could not bear to see it suffering, and paid for the spaying herself.

 

It was an additional financial burden she could not afford for long. “For every operation, I have to save money on several meals. After all, I am just a housewife and don’t have a salary.”

 

So when Winnie found out about the SAA’s work, she was overjoyed. “It means we can take more animals in for neutering, and the money saved can be used on other kinds of medical treatment.”

 

She believes TNR is important work. “Stray cats and dogs are treated so inhumanely. People expect them to survive on their own and most don’t even bat an eyelid when the animal gets hit by a car. They don’t see it as part of their responsibility to take care of these lives. We really should not abandon these animals,” she said.

 

“Calling for help from the agricultural and fisheries department is no cure, either. The only way we can really protect the welfare of strays is to reduce their numbers.”

 

In recent days, the number of strays she sees on the roads has noticeably dropped, and there are also fewer cases of pups getting run over by cars. This makes Winnie really happy.

 

Like El Chan, Winnie is no stranger to public abuse and doubts about her volunteer work. “I’ve thought of giving up, since I’ve done my fair bit. But whenever I think that the animals may have nothing to eat, I can’t bring myself to stop. I try to explain my work to those villagers who abuse me. I feed the dogs so I can gain their trust, in order to catch them and take them to the clinic for neutering,” she said.

 

Not everyone is won over, however. “Some even pour bleach on the spot where we feed the cats and dogs,” she said.

 

Winnie’s family have also pressured her to stop: her husband thinks she’s spending unnecessary money and is worried she might get hurt, while her 11-year-old son complains that she doesn’t spend enough time with him.

 

But her eight-year-old son has been a staunch supporter, and even goes with her on her feeding missions. “When he was younger, he would go up to the owners of dogs and cats he sees in public to ask if the animals have been neutered. If they answered no, he would shout for me to go and talk to them,” Winnie said, laughing.

 

At the end of the day, she hopes she’s setting a good example for her child. “We should let our children know that it’s important to care not just for our fellow human beings, but also for animals.”

 


Text by : So Mei Chi         Translated by : Chen Zhijun

 

Since 2009, the Society for Abandoned Animals has provided a free neutering service for dogs roaming Hong Kong’s car parks and warehouses. The programme, which limits their numbers and prevents needless death, is made possible with the support of Fu Tak Iam Foundation.

 

The SAA has completed 3,400 such procedures to date. Yet, the programme might never have started if it weren’t for the newborn pups found on the society’s doorsteps.

 

El Chan (third from right) says running a charity like the SAA has not been easy, and she once thought of giving up. But, luckily, sponsorship has helped to keep the services going.

 

The society is located in Yuen Long’s Pak Sha Tsuen. Even before we arrived, we could hear a symphony of barks, whines and meows as we approached. At the time of our visit, a total of 178 dogs and 78 cats lived here under the care of founder El Chan and her team.

 

In the 1990s, Yuen Long had no shortage of agricultural land lying fallow, and rent was relatively cheap. So in 1998, Chan and some friends rented the building of a former pig farm for the purpose of housing abandoned animals.

 

Chan used to run a pet grooming shop in Happy Valley. After she moved to the village, she found herself adjusting to many customs that were new to her. The one custom that most upset her had to do with people’s attitudes to animals.

 

“A black dog, for example, is acceptable here. But if it has a patch of white hair, it may be beaten to death because villagers consider such a dog unlucky. They think the colour mix of its fur resembles the clothing of someone in mourning. We’ve taken in many of these dogs.”

 

Newborn puppies in a plastic bag

Soon after it was set up, the SAA began to receive a steady stream of abandoned animals. Residents from all around would leave them at the society’s doors. When Chan came to work in the morning, she often found animals tied to the front door. Sometimes, she arrived to the sight of pups – still wet from their mother’s uterus and with the umbilical cord attached – wriggling in a plastic bag hung from the door handle.

 

Their eyes were still closed, so they had not even a glimpse of the outside world before being dumped into a plastic bag.

 

“They would have received none of their mother’s milk, which meant they had no antibodies. Even when the weather was sweltering, their body temperatures would quickly drop. Their chances of survival are next to nothing,” Chan said. “Looking at them, I see a cycle of life – one batch arrives and one batch dies. It’s too pitiful.”

 

This has a lot to do with the villagers’ habit of keeping dogs around the village. These dogs, which are fed but live outside the house, are often deployed as guard dogs. They may seem like stray dogs to outsiders, but villagers consider them as fong yong pets.

 

Since there are no security guards in the village, unlike in city apartments, these dogs have become an important part of neighbourhood security. They keep watch over car parks and warehouses, barking whenever a stranger approached.

 

Many of the SAA’s animals are too old to have a reasonable chance of being adopted, El Chan says. But the society will keep its promise and allow these animals to live out their remaining years as comfortably as possible.

 

“The villagers leave them enough leftovers to keep them alive, and those who turn out to be good guard dogs would be selected for breeding. Out of every litter that is born, one or two will be raised to adulthood, to take over as guard dogs after the older dogs died.”

 

Of course, many more dogs are born than the villagers need. A fertile bitch can give birth twice a year, each time to a litter of up to 10 pups. Some of these puppies would grow up to become village dogs or strays; some get injured in fights or become infected with heartworm and other diseases, and often don’t live beyond three, four years. Some don’t even survive a week – newborns are often thrown into the rubbish bin to be buried alive or crushed to death during rubbish collection.

 

Being left in a plastic bag tied to the SAA’s door handle might seem a kinder fate. Those who left the pups there probably thought so.

 

Breaking the cycle of life and instant death

To prevent the needless deaths of so many dogs, Chan decided to persuade and encourage villagers to send their dogs to be neutered by the SAA’s vets.

 

It was important to take a friendly approach. A typical conversation goes like this:

 

“Oh, what a lot of dogs you have there. So many of them in a litter, are you keeping them all?”

 

“Do you want them? Take them! We can’t have so many of them. They’ll be thrown away if no one wants them.”

 

“How about I try to find some families to raise these puppies, and then send the mother to be sterilised? For free.”

 

Not a few villagers were suspicious of Chan’s motives, and could not believe she would not charge for the neutering service. Some even drove her off, snarling, “Don't come near my dog!”

 

Chan smiled as she recalled those days. “This is 100 per cent true – mention neutering to a male villager and you would be chased away for sure, because the idea is unthinkable to a man. The men think a neutered dog would become too gentle and therefore useless as a guard dog. But the fact is, a dog’s character, once formed, does not change that easily,” she said.

 

“The women can more readily accept the need for neutering, perhaps because they understand the pain of birth. Once villagers began to see that we were returning the dogs safely to the village after the procedure, word went round about our work.”

 

This is the SAA’s version of the “trap, neuter, release” (TNR) programme widely used to control the numbers of stray animals. When the society began offering the service, before 2009, it lacked the resources to do more than perform the occasional neutering service. It was not until 2009, when Fu Tak Iam Foundation provided it with funds and a group of volunteers were recruited, that the programme could be rolled out more comprehensively.

 

In a record year, the SAA performed more than 800 neutering procedures. “I remember one day when the vet had to take care of more than 30 dogs – it was non-stop work.” These days, the monthly caseload is over 20.

 

There are two reasons for the reduction, Chan said. One, more organisations are now providing a similar service; two, the TNR programme has been effective, as the dog numbers have dropped.

 

Most hearteningly, she said, she’s seeing fewer cases of a plastic bag full of pups – from a few cases every month, to one case every few months.

 

In the course of her work, Chan has met many volunteers who come from different parts of Hong Kong and who go around feeding village dogs and taking care of them. The trust they have built up with the dogs makes it easier for the SAA to capture them for neutering. “If some people were to call us heroes for the work we do, I’d say these volunteers are the true heroes,” she said.

 

Finding a new owner for a dog or a cat who would really love them is a moment of joy.

 

 

 

If we don’t speak up, who will?

To support the SAA’s work, Fu Tak Iam Foundation also funds a food bank to provide food for the dogs, as well as underwrite the costs of medical treatments for both stray and village dogs at the SAA. “Such services not only benefit the animals, but also the pet owners with low or no income, such as the homeless and those on welfare, by helping to lighten their burden.”

 

“We were often abused when we first started providing care for abandoned animals. People called us crazy, and told us to get out. They said, ‘There are human beings starving and all you care about are the dogs? Are you crazy?’” Chan said.

 

“My reply to them was that while humans could rely on our wisdom and capability to help ourselves and help one another, our pets rely on us to survive. They have no choice – they have to live with whatever circumstance they were born into. If we don’t speak up for them, who will?”

 

No animal left behind

The Society for Abandoned Animals was founded in 1997 by a group of animal rights advocates, and was registered as a charity a year later.

 

Chan never dreamed she would end up working in the non-profit sector. The turning point came in the run-up to the handover in 1997. “Many of my friends were leaving Hong Kong. Knowing that I love animals, they asked me to find their pets new owners. I’d known these cats and dogs since they were young and could not bear to see them abandoned, so I ended up adopting more and more of them… I was taking care of as many as 30 to 40 at one point.”

 

With so many animals to care for, Chan found herself struggling to cope with her pet grooming business. She at first sought help from an animal welfare organisation, Hong Kong’s only such group at the time that took in abandoned animals. “But when I called, the centre told me not to send the animals to them, and do what I could myself,” Chan said. “They said if the animals were sent there, they would only be put down.”

 

Today, the SAA’s mission is guided by its motto of “Love Animal, Respect Life, No Killing or Abandoning”. It is easier said than done, of course. Given the constraints of physical space, there is a limit to how many animals the society can take in. To ensure the animals are given a reasonable quality of living, the SAA sometimes has to turn away owners who wanted to leave their pets there.

 

Chan tries her best to persuade the owners to reconsider. “I don’t ask that the dog or cat be treated as a person, but at the least we ought to see them as a life. If we show them care, they can feel it,” she said.

 

“Love Animals, Respect Life, No Killing or Abandoning” is the society’s motto.

Medical centre

In November 2005, the society set up a medical centre that comes with an operation room and quarantine facilities. Apart from providing the usual range of vet services, the centre also supports the SAA’s TNR programme and offers free or subsidised treatment for animals that need it.

 

The centre’s vet consultant, Dr Patrick Chong, said the animals that left the deepest impression on him so far were a few dogs that were rescued from a breeding farm.

 

“The pet trade is so lucrative that the bitches were caged soon after they were born, and made to breed as soon as they became mature. Typically, these dogs give birth to three litters a year, every year, and are abandoned as soon as they can’t breed anymore,” he said.

 

Consultant vet Patrick Chong calls for an end to pet buying, so as to curb the illegal and inhumane breeding practices.

“The dogs I saw were skin and bones when they came here. Their teeth had rotted away and they could barely eat. They also had all kinds of skin infections and arthritic pain. Some of them also had tumours in their mammary glands. It was heart-breaking to see.”

 

Although space was limited, El Chan could not bear to turn them away. “We try to take in as many as we can. Those dogs from the breeding farm were in such horrific condition that our vets could only do what they could to ease the dogs’ suffering in their remaining days. Some were in such a bad way that we had to put them down to ease their suffering.”

 

The problem must be solved at root. In recent years, the SAA has strengthened its education campaign to provide free talks at schools and organise visits to the SAA centre. “We hope the children will take the message to their parents, a reminder that the decision to raise a pet must be taken with careful thought, and to reconsider buying a pet from a pet shop. In most cases, people don’t mean to mistreat their pets, but end up mistreating them all the same because they didn’t know any better.”

 

TNR volunteer: Never again

Winnie would be one of those volunteers El Chan calls a hero.

 

About a decade ago, Winnie noticed several dogs in her village scavenging food in the rubbish heaps. An old woman who used to look after the dogs could no longer do so when money became tight, so she fed the dogs only occasionally. When Winnie found out, she began cooking more every day so she could feed the leftovers to the dogs.

 

She gradually grew fond of the dogs. One day, Winnie realised that one of them, a bitch, was pregnant. After the dog gave birth, however, the old woman took the puppies to Luen Wo Hui and sold them to some dog eaters, at HK$100 each. When Winnie found out, she prayed that nothing like that would ever happen again.

 

Yet, half a year later, the bitch became pregnant again. Though Winnie was eager to take it to the vet for spaying, she was advised to take the safer and cheaper course and wait till after the delivery. Sadly, it was not to be.

 

One day – the day after a storm of typhoon signal 8 – Winnie found the bitch lying in a ditch with several newborn pups. She quickly took them to the vet but could not save them – the mother had died along with her pups.

 

“I fed the dog for a year. I was so sad. From that day onwards, I told myself, ‘Never again – I must take these dogs to the vet for spaying’.”

 

The first dog she caught was a bitch that had given birth so often that part of its uterus protruded from its body, and it would get burnt when it sat on the ground on hot days. Winnie could not bear to see it suffering, and paid for the spaying herself.

 

It was an additional financial burden she could not afford for long. “For every operation, I have to save money on several meals. After all, I am just a housewife and don’t have a salary.”

 

So when Winnie found out about the SAA’s work, she was overjoyed. “It means we can take more animals in for neutering, and the money saved can be used on other kinds of medical treatment.”

 

She believes TNR is important work. “Stray cats and dogs are treated so inhumanely. People expect them to survive on their own and most don’t even bat an eyelid when the animal gets hit by a car. They don’t see it as part of their responsibility to take care of these lives. We really should not abandon these animals,” she said.

 

“Calling for help from the agricultural and fisheries department is no cure, either. The only way we can really protect the welfare of strays is to reduce their numbers.”

 

In recent days, the number of strays she sees on the roads has noticeably dropped, and there are also fewer cases of pups getting run over by cars. This makes Winnie really happy.

 

Like El Chan, Winnie is no stranger to public abuse and doubts about her volunteer work. “I’ve thought of giving up, since I’ve done my fair bit. But whenever I think that the animals may have nothing to eat, I can’t bring myself to stop. I try to explain my work to those villagers who abuse me. I feed the dogs so I can gain their trust, in order to catch them and take them to the clinic for neutering,” she said.

 

Not everyone is won over, however. “Some even pour bleach on the spot where we feed the cats and dogs,” she said.

 

Winnie’s family have also pressured her to stop: her husband thinks she’s spending unnecessary money and is worried she might get hurt, while her 11-year-old son complains that she doesn’t spend enough time with him.

 

But her eight-year-old son has been a staunch supporter, and even goes with her on her feeding missions. “When he was younger, he would go up to the owners of dogs and cats he sees in public to ask if the animals have been neutered. If they answered no, he would shout for me to go and talk to them,” Winnie said, laughing.

 

At the end of the day, she hopes she’s setting a good example for her child. “We should let our children know that it’s important to care not just for our fellow human beings, but also for animals.”

 


Text by : So Mei Chi           Translated by : Chen Zhijun