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In January 2010, a catastrophic earthquake hit Haiti. This had an immediate impact on the lives of at least 3 million people who were already living in extreme poverty. Over 220,000 people were killed, 2 million were in need of aid, and more than 1.7 million were left homeless. Thanks to the Fu Tak Iam Foundation’s generous donation that helps the quake affected regain their faith in life and a hope for the future.


World Vision has been working in Haiti over 30 years. In the immediate aftermath of the disaster, our relief teams worked tirelessly, day and night, to deliver critical support to survivors. We have provided income generation opportunities, small grants and vocational training to help improve their skills and restore agricultural activities that will eventually lead them to return to normal life. Last year, World Vision Hong Kong raised over HK$43 million, enabling us to continue carrying out relief and rehabilitation work in the hard-hit areas. Our major areas of relief work in Haiti include:


Housing the earthquake survivors: 113,400 tarpaulins and 7,500 tents were distributed; transitional shelters for the housing of 620 families were also provided
Food and clean water: 189.6 million litres of drinkable water were distributed, and 220,000 families fed
Life-saving household supplies: 350,450 people received aid
Healthcare and sanitation: 11 clinics with professional medical personnel now provide quality services and health education for survivors in 14 camps
Child Protection: 37 Child-Friendly Spaces were set up to enable children to learn and play free of emotional distress within a safe environment
Work and training: “Cash-for-Work” and “Cash-for-Training” schemes benefited at least 16,760 people

 

Housing:
Transitional shelters are provided for quake survivors, 10 km outside of Port-Au-Prince. World Vision hopes to build approximately 3,500 shelters to meet the needs of children and their families.

 

A normal life again:
30-year-old Alene is very happy to be able to lead a normal life again. Photographed with her inside the World Vision-built transitional shelter, are her children 3-year-old Sivron (left), 6-year-old Davidson (middle), 2-year-old Darlene (sleeping on the mat), and the boy living next door, Robaine (right).

 

Nutritious food:
Children are enjoying a lunch of rice and beans at a camp 15 km outside of Port-Au-Prince.
 

 

Clean water:
Children are queuing up to wash their hands at a Child-Friendly Space.

 

 

Art therapy and an opportunity for education:
Child-Friendly Space is provided for the affected children to help relieve their distress, enable them to learn and play in a safe environment. 9-year-old David draws the house he dreams of.
 

 

Healthcare:
Professional medical staff is stationed in mobile clinics to provide quality services for survivors. Besides, the health status of many homeless children are monitored and cared for both in temporary shelters, and Women- and Child-Friendly Spaces. Pregnant women also receive pre- and post-pregnancy care.

 


Nutrition classes:
Nutrition classes are available for mothers to improve their knowledge on nutrition and hygiene.

 

 

 

Success Story

 

Bellanda: The family living in hope

The lives of 10-year-old Bellanda and her family are enriched after participating in the many activities the camp offers.

 

10-year-old Bellanda (dressed in white) and her family were deeply affected by the catastrophic earthquake, and had to leave their damaged home in the area around Port-Au-Prince. They then moved into a World Vision camp for internally displaced persons. Before the earthquake, Bellanda’s mother, Netude, had a small business selling household items, but after the earthquake, like many other families, Netude can no longer sustain her business. Fortunately, World Vision’s “Cash-For-Work” programme came to the rescue in time, providing much needed money to cover the family’s basic needs. Both Netude and her husband Gerard have participated in the programme - through which they get paid to maintain the cleanliness of the camp. 

World Vision provides a small charcoal cooking stove for Bellanda’s family, so they can return to a normal routine.

 

Bellanda’s family also received many basic items provided by World Vision. These include a mosquito net, blankets and sheets; a large plastic storage bins to hold valuable items, a sleeping mat, a small charcoal cooking stove, and hygiene kits etc. Gerard attended the training on business management, and hopes to have his own small business one day. He said, “The training taught me sales and business management techniques as well as basic accounting. I have also learned the importance of not just earning money, but also the need to contribute towards my local community, which in turn, will allow my business to grow.”

Bellanda (holding one of her drawings) enjoys jumping rope and playing hide-and-seek with her three best friends pictured with her here in a World Vision’s Child-Friendly Space.

 

 

Bellanda also attended World Vision’s Child-Friendly Space. She loves singing and drawing and is always happily playing with her friends. Gradually she is leaving behind the stress caused by the earthquake. “I want to be a pediatrician one day,” Bellanda told us her dream. Indeed, the medical profession is very important in the camps. Gerard concluded, “I’m grateful to the World Vision’s doctors and nurses for their healthcare support. I’d also like to thank World Vision for the great work they are doing in our communities, and I pray their work continues so that more people can benefit.”



Gerard has become an outspoken advocate for making Haiti a better place for children. “World Vision has taught us how to help our children to get what they need in terms of physical, moral, intellectual, and social development.” Netude agrees with her husband, for she too has learned useful information from the MFothers’ Club. “They have taught us how to plan a better future for our family.”

 

 

(Article provided by World Vision Hong Kong)

In January 2010, a catastrophic earthquake hit Haiti. This had an immediate impact on the lives of at least 3 million people who were already living in extreme poverty. Over 220,000 people were killed, 2 million were in need of aid, and more than 1.7 million were left homeless. Thanks to the Fu Tak Iam Foundation’s generous donation that helps the quake affected regain their faith in life and a hope for the future.


World Vision has been working in Haiti over 30 years. In the immediate aftermath of the disaster, our relief teams worked tirelessly, day and night, to deliver critical support to survivors. We have provided income generation opportunities, small grants and vocational training to help improve their skills and restore agricultural activities that will eventually lead them to return to normal life. Last year, World Vision Hong Kong raised over HK$43 million, enabling us to continue carrying out relief and rehabilitation work in the hard-hit areas. Our major areas of relief work in Haiti include:


Housing the earthquake survivors: 113,400 tarpaulins and 7,500 tents were distributed; transitional shelters for the housing of 620 families were also provided
Food and clean water: 189.6 million litres of drinkable water were distributed, and 220,000 families fed
Life-saving household supplies: 350,450 people received aid
Healthcare and sanitation: 11 clinics with professional medical personnel now provide quality services and health education for survivors in 14 camps
Child Protection: 37 Child-Friendly Spaces were set up to enable children to learn and play free of emotional distress within a safe environment
Work and training: “Cash-for-Work” and “Cash-for-Training” schemes benefited at least 16,760 people

Housing:
Transitional shelters are provided for quake survivors, 10 km outside of Port-Au-Prince. World Vision hopes to build approximately 3,500 shelters to meet the needs of children and their families.

 

A normal life again:
30-year-old Alene is very happy to be able to lead a normal life again. Photographed with her inside the World Vision-built transitional shelter, are her children 3-year-old Sivron (left), 6-year-old Davidson (middle), 2-year-old Darlene (sleeping on the mat), and the boy living next door, Robaine (right).

 



Nutritious food:
Children are enjoying a lunch of rice and beans at a camp 15 km outside of Port-Au-Prince.
 

Clean water:
Children are queuing up to wash their hands at a Child-Friendly Space.

 

Art therapy and an opportunity for education:
Child-Friendly Space is provided for the affected children to help relieve their distress, enable them to learn and play in a safe environment. 9-year-old David draws the house he dreams of
 

Healthcare:
Professional medical staff is stationed in mobile clinics to provide quality services for survivors. Besides, the health status of many homeless children are monitored and cared for both in temporary shelters, and Women- and Child-Friendly Spaces. Pregnant women also receive pre- and post-pregnancy care.

 

Nutrition classes:
Nutrition classes are available for mothers to improve their knowledge on nutrition and hygiene.

 

Success Story

 

Bellanda: The family living in hope

The lives of 10-year-old Bellanda and her family are enriched after participating in the many activities the camp offers.

 

10-year-old Bellanda (dressed in white) and her family were deeply affected by the catastrophic earthquake, and had to leave their damaged home in the area around Port-Au-Prince. They then moved into a World Vision camp for internally displaced persons. Before the earthquake, Bellanda’s mother, Netude, had a small business selling household items, but after the earthquake, like many other families, Netude can no longer sustain her business. Fortunately, World Vision’s “Cash-For-Work” programme came to the rescue in time, providing much needed money to cover the family’s basic needs. Both Netude and her husband Gerard have participated in the programme - through which they get paid to maintain the cleanliness of the camp.

 

World Vision provides a small charcoal cooking stove for Bellanda’s family, so they can return to a normal routine.

 

Bellanda’s family also received many basic items provided by World Vision. These include a mosquito net, blankets and sheets; a large plastic storage bins to hold valuable items, a sleeping mat, a small charcoal cooking stove, and hygiene kits etc. Gerard attended the training on business management, and hopes to have his own small business one day. He said, “The training taught me sales and business management techniques as well as basic accounting. I have also learned the importance of not just earning money, but also the need to contribute towards my local community, which in turn, will allow my business to grow.”

 

Bellanda (holding one of her drawings) enjoys jumping rope and playing hide-and-seek with her three best friends pictured with her here in a World Vision’s Child-Friendly Space.



Bellanda also attended World Vision’s Child-Friendly Space. She loves singing and drawing and is always happily playing with her friends. Gradually she is leaving behind the stress caused by the earthquake. “I want to be a pediatrician one day,” Bellanda told us her dream. Indeed, the medical profession is very important in the camps. Gerard concluded, “I’m grateful to the World Vision’s doctors and nurses for their healthcare support. I’d also like to thank World Vision for the great work they are doing in our communities, and I pray their work continues so that more people can benefit.”


Gerard has become an outspoken advocate for making Haiti a better place for children. “World Vision has taught us how to help our children to get what they need in terms of physical, moral, intellectual, and social development.” Netude agrees with her husband, for she too has learned useful information from the Mothers’ Club. “They have taught us how to plan a better future for our family.”

 

(Article provided by World Vision Hong Kong)